Bristol Budget Conversation – Focus on City Development

Read the section you’re interested in and comment at the bottom of the page

City Development Revenue Expenditure

The City Development Revenue budget is £49 million consisting of £99 million expenditure offset by £50 million income.

£7.5 million expenditure relates to departmental and corporate support services charges the main elements of which are accommodation charges (£1.5 million) and support services charges eg: IT, HR and Finance (£5 million). These costs will be considered in a separate consultation exercise.

The City Development department provides a wide range of services summarised below as eight main areas of service provision.

  1. Passenger Transport
  2. Parking Services
  3. Highways, Traffic & City Transport
  4. Planning, Urban Design & Sustainable Development
  5. Libraries, Museums, Galleries & Archives
  6. Arts, Festivals, Events & Colston Hall
  7. Economic Development & Regeneration
  8. Major Projects

City Development - Revenue budget 2010/11

1. Passenger Transport

23% of City Development expenditure relates to Passenger Transport

The principal activities include:

  • Procure and manage passenger transport service contracts for non-commercial bus, park & ride, community transport, rail & ferry services, as well as for Home to School and Adult Care services (Passenger Services).  This is being drawn together under a new Integrated Transport Unit (ITU).
  • Coordinate the upgrade of bus routes as part of the Showcase Greater Bristol Bus Network (GBBN) and other public transport infrastructure.
  • Provide public transport information including timetable sheets, maps and real time displays at bus stops.
  • Manage and operate the concessionary travel scheme for people with disabilities and/or aged 60 or over.

Net expenditure is relatively stable at £11.6m in 2009/10 (excluding Home to School and Passenger Services). Of this approximately 50% (£5.9m) is accounted for by the concessionary travel scheme with most of the remainder on supported services and providing passenger information.  Staff revenue costs amount to less than £500k.

The following budget pressures are anticipated over the next 3 years:

  • Some staff engaged on capital projects are funded from the Government capital finance – as this reduces then staff will need to reduce or be funded from the revenue budget.
  • Most bus service contracts were awarded in 2006 and will terminate in September 2011.  This provides an opportunity to review the contracted network and make decisions about how it should be provided in the future.  It seems probable that on a like for like basis the cost of new contracts will be higher than in 2006.
  • The integration of passenger services procurement into the Integrated Transport Unit provides the opportunity to mitigate this upward pressure to some extent.

The chart below shows how much Bristol City Council spends on Passenger Transport.

Passenger transport expenditure - revenue budget 2010/11

Passenger transport expenditure - revenue budget 2010/11

Passenger
Transport 2010/2011

Bristol

Core city average

Near statistical neighbour average

Variance

Core city

Near statistical neighbour

Public transport
– Concessionary fares per head of population

£18.70

£19.36

£17.60

3.4%

-6.2%

– Support to operators per head of
population

£12.94

£38.15

£5.20

66.1%

-148.8%

– Co-ordination costs per head of population

£1.67

£1.56

£0.60

-7.1%

-178.3%

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2. Parking Services

Parking Services contributes £3.4 million net income to support transport expenditure within City Development, arising from the provision of both on-street and off-street parking.

Parking Services is responsible for the enforcement of the City’s parking restrictions under the Transport Act 2000 and the Traffic Management Act (TMA) 2004 Part VI, including vehicle removals, bus lane enforcement by CCTV and the subsequent back office processes.  Parking Services operates and maintains the City’s public car parks and on street Pay & Display parking facilities including the sale of advance tickets, long stay permits and residents’ parking permits.  The team also operates the statutory Disabled Person’s Blue Badge Scheme on behalf of the Council and the Cabinet approved advisory disabled bay scheme.

Parking Services has a net income budget of £3.4 million, which is made up of just over £10 million income and £6.7 million expenditure.  The income budget is broadly made up of parking charges (£6.75 million), Penalty Charge Notices  (£2.25 million), permit sales (£730k), parking bay suspensions (£270k).  The key items of expenditure are staff costs (£3.6 million), asset management costs (£1.3 million), business and financial costs (£1.1 million), running costs for the Operations Team (£430k), running costs for the Enforcement Team (£260k) & statutory & formal costs relating to Penalty Charges Notices (70k).

Parking Services has a capital budget of nearly £1 million to replace the multi-storey car park lifts.  Parking Services will also be responsible for the repayment over 5 years of a £1.7 million capital loan to finance the replacement of the handheld computers used by the Civil Enforcement Officers and the set up costs relating to Bus Lane Enforcement, Residents’ Parking Schemes and the expansion of the Controlled Parking Zone.

Cost pressures anticipated for 2010-11 (and potentially longer) include the handling of the increase in VAT, and car park maintenance is an ongoing issue as a number of our car parks are old and showing increasing signs of wear and tear.  We are also awaiting the results of the full structural survey of Trenchard MSCP. This is however being mitigated to some extent by the creation of a car park renewals fund.

Parking Services Budget

Parking Services Budget

Parking Services 2010/2011

Bristol

Core city average

Near statistical neighbour average

Variance

Core city

Near statistical neighbour

Parking services
– net (income)/expenditure per head of population

-£6.80

-£9.78

-£8.00

30.5%

15.0%

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3. Highways, Traffic and City Transport

20% of City Development expenditure relates to highways & traffic services.

Highways Engineering

The Council’s Engineering group is responsible for routine, reactive and planned maintenance of the public highway, including street lighting and winter maintenance.  It has a revenue budget of £8,872K and capital budget of £3,241k, some of this money has been devolved to the Neighbourhood Partnerships for local decision making.

Last winter’s severe weather increased pressure on the budget both to deal with the demand for gritting but also to repair the additional potholes and other damage caused by ice.  Some additional funding (£282k) has been made available by the Government to offset this.
The highways street lighting budget includes £1.9m for the electricity costs of running the streetlights and traffic signals.  The contract is due for renewal January 2011 and sensitive to price fluctuations.  Low energy use lighting initiatives are crucial to achieving carbon reduction and cost savings in this area.

Highways specialist drainage receives grant funding for the surface water management plan £80K for 10/11 and other particular locations, for example Sunderland Place £93k.  Other Environment Agency funding may be forthcoming for larger schemes.

An ongoing project within the Highways team is to complete the TAMP (Transport Asset Management Plan) to improve still further the efficiency of our maintenance operations.

Traffic Management

There are 3 areas of work within Traffic Management

Traffic Signals

This covers Traffic Signal Design and Implementation, Traffic Signal Maintenance, management of the traffic network through the Traffic Control Centre, Intelligent Transport Systems and Highway Network Management (control over activities on the highway, i.e. roadworks, events and incidents).  The capital budget is currently £550k reduced from £1m over the last 2 years. The revenue budget is just under £900k which covers maintenance of traffic signals, CCTV and variable message signs and communications costs.  Like in Passenger Transport, a reduction in Government capital funding could impact on staffing costs.

Traffic Client

This covers Area Engineering, the team that delivers the Minor Traffic schemes programme, which has been recently devolved to Neighbourhood Partnerships, along with Traffic Regulation Orders and the Customer Focus team who deal with public contact.  The revenue budget is £606k and capital budget is £410k.  A key initiative for this group is to provide improved support to the Neighbourhood Partnerships.

Road Safety

This covers road safety engineering as well as education, training and publicity.  In addition it is responsible for the delivery of cycling and walking related projects as well as managing the Rights of Way network, including the investigation of claims for new rights of way and promotion of diversion orders etc.  It has a capital budget of £1.481m and a revenue budget of £1.121m that includes £483k Road Safety Grant.  This funding is likely to revert back to near 2006 levels with the loss of government Road Safety Grant and reduced income from Speed choice.  This team also delivers cycle training, which has been a key component of the successful Cycling City programme.  This area also covers School Crossing Patrols.  This service has a revenue budget of £244k.

City Transport

The Council’s city transport service is responsible for planning the future city transport system;  which includes transport studies to support the development of new schemes such as Bus Rapid Transit, 20 mph speed limits and parking zones.  It also provides advice on the transport implications of planning applications and runs a programme of smarter choices activity such as school travel plans.  Its revenue budget is £1.2m.

The group works closely with the West of England Partnership office on the emerging Joint Local Transport Plan that will set the policy and programme for transport improvement for the next 15 years.

Highway, traffic and transport planning - revenue budget 2010/11

Highway, traffic and transport planning - revenue budget 2010/11

Highways,
traffic and transport planning 2010/2011

Bristol

Core city average

Near statistical neighbour average

Variance

Core city

Near statistical neighbour

Environmental safety and
routine maintenance of carriageways
– per head of population

£4.29

£13.35

£11.50

67.9%

62.7%

– per KM of roads

£1,584.06

£4,297.72

£3,418.20

63.1%

53.7%

Maintenance of carriageways over winter
– per head of population

£0.96

£2.06

£1.75

53.4%

45.1%

– per KM of roads

£354.64

£651.50

£487.89

45.6%

27.3%

Structural
maintenance of carriageways per head of population

£12.38

£7.29

£9.60

-69.8%

-29.0%

Repair, maintenance and cost of energy of street lighting
– per head of population

£8.04

£14.30

£12.40

43.8%

35.2%

– per KM of roads

£2,966.73

£4,404.06

£3,733.20

32.6%

20.5%

Transport planning, policy and strategy

£3.53

£4.28

£5.60

17.5%

37.0%

Traffic management and road safety
– per head of population

£6.84

£5.55

£5.75

-23.2%

-19.0%

– per KM of roads

£2,521.89

£1,804.69

£1,786.15

-39.7%

-41.2%

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4. Planning, Urban Design & Sustainable Development

Strategic Planning

This team perform the statutory strategic planning functions for the council, including the production of the Bristol Development Framework.  The latter includes the Core Strategy, Site Allocations DPD, Central Area Action Plan and Waste core Strategy, for example.  The service also undertakes relevant research and monitoring, handles S106 matters, and provides strategic planning advice on development proposals.  The annual budget is £678k, largely to fund staffing costs, with an establishment at present of just under 20 posts.

City Design

The City Design Group have a wide role in facilitating high quality urban design across the council, not only through advice on a variety of council projects (eg the Legible City project), but through advice in responding to planning applications and the progression of a small number of placed based regeneration projects.  They provide expertise on conservation and heritage aspects of city development, as well as landscape architecture.  The service earns income which could well be affected by reductions in regeneration and parks programmes, thereby impacting on staffing levels.  At present the staff establishment is 27 and the net service budget £872k.

Sustainable City

The Sustainable City Team plays a key role in helping to make Bristol a Green Capital and in particular lead the city’s response to climate change and peak oil, working with businesses and communities.  They also manage our statutory air and water quality responsibilities with a monitoring network across the city, accessible to citizens via the internet.  Within the council and with major partners they provide expert sustainability advice on major new policies, projects and strategies, including major transport plans and projects and planning applications.  With an establishment of circa 15 the net budget of £832k is largely for staff, albeit including expenditure of £100k on scientific monitoring.  Wider budget pressures may well impact on such valuable, but largely non-statutory, service areas.

Development Services

These two teams are responsible for dealing with all the planning and building control applications that the council receives, and all related matters, for advising the relevant quasi-judicial council committees and carrying out enforcement against unauthorised development.  Application numbers, particularly for major developments, are down significantly since their peak three years ago, and so income levels are reduced significantly.  This means that despite the use of reserves the planning side of the service is needing to reduce significantly to operate sustainably within budget.  Phase 1 downsizing is underway this year.

The base establishment of the planning side of this service is circa 45 at present costing £2.4m with income in the range £1.5-1.7m, and the gap underpinned by grant and reserves.  Building control operations operate as a trading account, have 18 staff, and a net budget of £123k.

Planning & Sustainable Development - Revenue Budget 2010/11

Planning & Sustainable Development - Revenue Budget 2010/11

Planning
and sustainable development 2010/2011

Bristol

Core city average

Near statistical neighbour average

Variance from average

Core city

Near statistical neighbour

%

%

Building
and planning services expenditure per head of population

£9.30

£9.45

£11.30

1.6%

17.7%

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5. Libraries, Museums, Galleries & Archives

Museums

Bristol Museums, Galleries & Archives manage 5 museum sites and the Records Office, at a cost of £4.2m. The funding includes £1.2m Renaissance grant direct from central government to deliver Bristol and Regional projects – Bristol projects centred on M Shed. The principal sites are City Museum and M Shed (currently being developed) and the Records Office.  Red Lodge, Georgian House, and Blaise, provide a diverse range of visitor services for the people of Bristol and visitors to the city.  All sites provide services that play a crucial role locally, regionally and nationally in the cultural, tourism, economic development, education and community cohesion agendas.  BARAS and Brerc are also run by BMGA and form part of the portfolio.  Both these services are self funding but are subject to a full business review by March 2011.

A full service review and restructure has just taken place, to ensure that the service is fit to deliver more exciting programmes, with more commercial and developmental approaches.  The Renaissance funding from central government has been subject to review since 2009, and it is expected that an entirely new funding model will be introduced in either 2011 or 2012. The implications for Bristol of this change are not yet known, and therefore temporary arrangements are being put in place in those parts of the service which are most exposed.

Consideration is being given to transferring the Museums & Archives service into an external trust. Many other local authorities have taken this approach, which as a minimum allows savings to be made on business rates. However, this option requires careful and timely consideration.

Exact comparisons of running costs of museums are difficult because they vary so much in size and complexity. Core City comparisons are Manchester Museum Service costs £11.32 per visit, Leeds costs £8.43 per visit and Bristol costs £8.04 per visit.

Libraries

Bristol Libraries delivers information, learning and reading activities citywide through 27 libraries, two learning centres and the CREATE environmental centre. Library and learning visits total around 2 million a year, and the customer base crosses all social, ethnic and age ranges. Key target customer groups are children and young people, older people (including those unable to visit libraries in person), and people who are traditionally under-represented among library users: disabled people, people for whom English is an additional language. A transformation programme is under way, affecting buildings and service offer, and is delivering significant improvements in take-up.

The overall priority for 2010/11 is to focus the service on improved delivery against directorate and corporate outcomes and on increased user take-up and satisfaction. This will be achieved through a clearly targeted activities programme and greatly improved performance management.

Libraries, museums, galleries and archives - revenue budget 2010/11

Libraries, museums, galleries and archives - revenue budget 2010/11

<table border=0 cellspacing=2 cellpadding=3 width=741>
<tr>
<td width=356 rowspan=2 bgcolor=”#33CCCC”><p><b><span style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Libraries,
museums, galleries and archives                                                                                  2010/2011</span></b></p></td>
<td width=71 rowspan=2 bgcolor=”#33CCCC”><p align=center style=’text-align:center’>
<st1:City w:st=”on”>
<st1:place
w:st=”on”>
<b><span style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Bristol</span></b></p></td>
<td width=81 rowspan=2 bgcolor=”#33CCCC”><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><b><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Core city average</span></b></p></td>
<td width=83 rowspan=2 bgcolor=”#33CCCC”><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><b><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Near statistical neighbour average</span></b></p></td>
<td width=151 colspan=2 bgcolor=”#33CCCC”><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><b><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Variance from average</span></b></p></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td width=76 valign=bottom bgcolor=”#33CCCC”><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><b><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Core city</span></b></p></td>
<td width=75 valign=bottom bgcolor=”#33CCCC”><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><b><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Near statistical neighbour</span></b></p></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p><span style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Culture
and heritage expenditure per head of population</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=right style=’text-align:right’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>£18.60</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=right style=’text-align:right’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>£22.72</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=right style=’text-align:right’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>£15.90</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>18.1%</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>-17.0%</span></p></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p><span style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Tourism
expenditure per head of population</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=right style=’text-align:right’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>£1.00</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=right style=’text-align:right’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>£2.65</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=right style=’text-align:right’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>£2.00</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>62.3%</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>50.0%</span></p></td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom>&nbsp;</td>
</tr>
<tr>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p><span style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>Library
expenditure per head of population</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=right style=’text-align:right’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>£20.30</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=right style=’text-align:right’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>£24.22</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=right style=’text-align:right’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>£20.20</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>16.2%</span></p></td>
<td nowrap valign=bottom><p align=center style=’text-align:center’><span
style=’font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial’>-0.5%</span></p></td>
</tr>
</table>
Libraries, museums, galleries and archives                                                                              2010/2011

Bristol

Core city average

Near statistical neighbour average

Variance from average

Core city

Near statistical neighbour

Culture and heritage expenditure per head of population

£18.60

£22.72

£15.90

18.1%

-17.0%

Tourism expenditure per head of population

£1.00

£2.65

£2.00

62.3%

50.0%

Library expenditure per head of population

£20.30

£24.22

£20.20

16.2%

-0.5%

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6. Arts, Festivals, Events & Colston Hall

6% of City Development expenditure funds arts, festivals and events including the operation of the Colston Hall.

The arts and culture service works to stimulate the distinctive cultural identity of the city and its communities, it provides leadership and promotion of all arts sectors including festivals in Bristol on both a local and regional level.  The work includes a year round programme of Festivals and Events.

The service manages the Colston Hall, a key arts provider within the music sector, and manages the Bristol Film Office, which advocates, supports and licences production companies who film in the city – last year saw over 1200 filming days generating inward investment to the city of over £23 million and attracts over £100,000 of income directly to the Local Authority.

The team manages festival and events licensing for over 420 licence applications and events each year, which generates over £140,000 income to the local authority. The larger events attract over 750,000 visitors a year and an estimate of around £12million pounds of spend in the city.

Some key service facts:

  • Key art providers support budget £887k
  • Grant funding 20 arts organisations in the city, which attracts £3.8 million of match funding from Arts Council
  • Colston Hall grant £923 k
  • Total turnover £2 million, generated through ticket sales and other sources of income 2009/10 130,325 tickets sold

Funding for free Festivals:  Harbour, Bristol Do, Square Sessions, Big screen: £250K
Attracting £385,000 match funding
Attracting over 280,000 people

Spend on Culture & Heritage, which includes arts and museums, is 12.3% lower than the core cities average.  Bristol’s support for arts organisations is particularly low, in part because we do not have a major symphony orchestra, or similar based here.

Arts, festivals, events and Colston Hall - revenue budget 2010/11

Arts, festivals, events and Colston Hall - revenue budget 2010/11

Arts,
Festivals, Events & Colston Hall

Bristol

Core city average

Near statistical neighbour average

Variance

Core city

Near statistical neighbour

Arts spend per head of population

£5.05

£7.16

n.a

29.5%

n.a

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7. Economic Development & Regeneration

5% of City Development expenditure is to fund Economic Development and Regeneration.

Economic Development & Regeneration aims to provide more, better jobs for local people, working to increase employment and investment in the city and to support workless people into employment; for example, we helped 2,700 local people to find jobs in Cabot Circus. In addition, we provide skills training for local people indirectly in partnership and more directly, through the successful On Site construction skills service.

The Regeneration part of the service has been through a significant reduction in it’s external grant funding in the last three years from £6.9m in 2008/09 to it’s current budget of £2.3m in 2010/11. The funding cliff hit at the end of 2008/09 when the European funding for two projects (Urban II and Objective 2) came to an end and 2008/09 and 2009/10 also saw the end of Government Neighbourhood Renewal transitional funding.

Economic Development works with companies and overseas investors looking to locate in Bristol, encourages new businesses to be created and supports existing businesses and key sectors (such as tourism, aerospace, creative / digital and environmental technologies) to innovate and compete, expand and grow. We have secured external (European) funding of up to £18m over the next 5 years to encourage new business start-ups and for innovation in the environmental technologies sector.

We also work to encourage the sustainable development of employment sites around the city, and contributes with others to support the Destination Bristol service.

The chart below breaks down the main elements of the budget.

Economic Development & Regeneration - revenue budget 2010/11

Economic Development & Regeneration - revenue budget 2010/11

Economic
Development 2010/2011

Bristol

Core city average

Near statistical neighbour average

Variance from average

Core city

Near statistical neighbour

%

%

Economic and community development expenditure per head of population

£22.50

£46.77

£24.70

51.9%

8.9%

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8. Major Projects

Divided into three main areas of operation:

  • Management of Major Projects
  • Building Practice
  • Docks

Management of Major Projects

A total of 15 staff employed on a wide range of projects mainly providing project management services.

The staffing costs are entirely funded from the project capital budgets.

Projects include:

  • Bristol Rapid Transit – Ashton Vale to Temple Meads    £  52m
  • Bristol Rapid Transit –  North Fringe to Hengrove        £198m
  • South Bristol Link – £  57m
  • Greater Bristol Bus Network (GBBN) – £  77m
  • Cycling City – £  22m
  • Knowle West Regeneration Framework to be determined
  • Hengrove Park Leisure Centre £  23m
  • Hengrove Park Phase 1 & 2  to be determined
  • Lockleaze Development Programme to be determined
  • Avonmouth Wind Turbines £   9m

All projects are at varying stages in the project lifecycle.  With the exception of GBBN and Cycling City the bulk of the project teams are generally resourced from the private sector.

The prospects for some of the transport projects identified above are uncertain until after the comprehensive spending review in October.

Building Practice

A total of 49 staff are employed within the Building Practice which provides multi-discipline property maintenance, design, refurbishment and energy management service for the whole council.

The Building Practice has a total running cost of £2.9m and an income of £3m.

The available budget for specific projects in 10/11 is £13.9m.  This is divided between revenue £5.5m and capital £8.4m.

The Building Practice also provides through the energy management unit a full range of energy and environmental initiatives including energy purchase schemes for the whole council.

The council has an outstanding backlog of repairs and maintenance of £79m but we are reducing this backlog in an acceptable way.  Future budget pressures may impact on this progress.

The Building Practice is undertaking a full value for money exercise by comparing itself with other authorities and the private sector over the next six months.

Docks

A total of 56 staff are employed within the Docks estate divided into three main operational areas:

  • Docks Operations
  • Docks Maintenance
  • Docks Leisure

The total expenditure is £2.92m with a projected income of £1.72m resulting in a revenue support of £1.20m.

Primarily, operating as a leisure harbour, the Docks estate undertakes the council’s statutory role as Harbour Authority under the various Bristol Dock Acts and Orders.

The area managed is between Cumberland Basin and Hanham Lock and include for such diverse activities as maintenance of the various swing bridges and lock gates, dredging, licensing of moorings, estate management of a wide variety of dockside buildings and a full range of leisure events within the docks.

Comparison with other dock operations is difficult but the whole service is being taken through a complete review over the next six months to ensure that the services being provided do represent good value for money and going forward reflects the increasing emphasis on the leisure aspect of the docks’ management.

Major projects - revenue budgets 2010/11

Major projects - revenue budgets 2010/11

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Summary

We hope you’ve found these full and detailed breakdowns of our spending helpful – along with the comparisons to how much we spend alongside other similar Councils.  Do you have any suggestions, ideas or challenges for where we should look most closely at spending less or raising more income?

Please give us your ideas and suggestions

We hope you’ll find this useful in helping you give us your thoughts and ideas around our four big questions:

  • Which services, if any, should we consider delivering at a reduced level or even ceasing altogether?
  • Which services might be better provided by other bodies, such as the voluntary sector, or with others, such as the NHS or neighbouring councils?
  • Do you have any other ideas based on your experience for service areas where we could further explore saving money?
  • Are there any service areas from which we should aim to raise more income?

Leave a comment below for the public conversation.

If you prefer to make a private submission of your views, please click here.

38 thoughts on “Bristol Budget Conversation – Focus on City Development

  1. I think there should be some monitoring of the city’s air and water quality and I understand that some of these activities are statutory, but surely there must be some overlap with other agencies. For example, I thought it was the Environment Agency’s responsibility to monitor river water quality. Why is the council doing that?

  2. I was quite amazed to receive through my door, hand delivered a nice expensive glossy on the Whiteladies Road/Westbury Road Greater Bristol Bus Network proposal. The informal consultation including a shop leased on Blackboy Hill must be costing an incredible amount – many tens of thousands of pounds. I read with interest that the 10 schemes of the GBBN were to receive 42million pounds from central government at a time when the Comprehensive Spending Review had not even confirmed what the Department of Transport would be receiving or how much it was going to be cut by, obviously BCC had inside knowledge that the rest of us mortals were not privy to. I would suggest that BCC should have stopped the GBBN Whiteladies Road/Westbury Park exercise earlier this year to await the CSR rather than embark on this expensive and costly exercise. It just shows yet again the incredible lack of thinking that is prevalent in the council today. BCC should be persuading the bus company that a prepaid ‘Oyster’ system is required that would significantly speed up bus transit. See my e-petition on the council website at:- http://epetitions.bristol.gov.uk/epetition_core/community/activepetitions

  3. I would have thought a good way to save money would be to discontinue the Sunday opening of central library? I also saw in the Post recently that Clifton library has found money for a big refurbishment; where has this suddenly appeared from please?

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